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Superwholock and a whole bunch of other shit have permanently compromised my ability to can. --


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*pssst* Happy birthday


yesterday, fool

17 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | J | 0 notes

To all my new followers who I haven’t greeted yet

i-learned-it-from-the-pizzaman:

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HERE TAKE SOME CATS

1 week ago on July 20th, 2014 | J | 332 notes

The people in sharknado shouldn’t complain about sharks because some sharks in other parts of the world weren’t attacking them #notallsharks

1 week ago on July 19th, 2014 | J | 19 notes

deducingsherlockian:

the sign of the gays

2 weeks ago on July 13th, 2014 | J | 43,506 notes
OMG I am liek you're biggest fannnnnnnn you are so majorly swaggy liek 1002 swags you k what I meen? U= kewl Kthxbye Swaggin


hi Adina…

everyone follow her cuz we share genetics and lived in the same woman. Also she’s special needs and needs pity :P just look at how she writes

3 weeks ago on July 10th, 2014 | J | 5 notes
me: Hey sis can I show you something
sister: Does it have to do with boobs?
me: not this time!
sister: supernatural
me: yes
sister: castiel
me: uh yeah
sister: do you want to show me his eyes again?
me: THEY'RE SO BLUEEEE
3 weeks ago on July 7th, 2014 | J | 294 notes
lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

 Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded



If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?
It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.
In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.
“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.
What does this mean?
In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.
However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.
These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.
In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.
This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:
How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?
Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.
How can a squib be born to wizard parents?
Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.
How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?
The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.
You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.




Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.



FAVOURITE THING

lissaraptor:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

What does this mean?

In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

image

FAVOURITE THING

3 weeks ago on July 7th, 2014 | J | 106,613 notes
I need your theme. Where can I get it? Thanks!!


Click the light on top of the tardis ^.^

3 weeks ago on July 7th, 2014 | J | 2 notes
Once you get this, you have to say five nice things about yourself publicly, then send it to ten of your favorite followers.


Ha ok self esteem I dig it

1) I art and I really enjoy it
2) I think I’m reasonably attractive
3) I’m pretty positive and optimistic
4) it’s hard writing nice stuff about yourself… uh I think I’m doing a pretty good job being a camp councilor - we won the talent show as a group!
5) i spent the last year in a foreign country (Israel) so that was hard but I did it! And for vacation I was 2 weeks alone in london

3 weeks ago on July 7th, 2014 | J | 3 notes
johnnyis:

whisperingghosts:

stardogchampion:

Sean Bean is the fucking man.

It left out the part where he was defending a female friend from a creep in the fight and how he used a first aid kit to stitch up his own stab wound.

One does not simply walk into a hospital.

johnnyis:

whisperingghosts:

stardogchampion:

Sean Bean is the fucking man.

It left out the part where he was defending a female friend from a creep in the fight and how he used a first aid kit to stitch up his own stab wound.

One does not simply walk into a hospital.

1 month ago on June 24th, 2014 | J | 161,582 notes

fanbingblink:

Representation matters

1 month ago on June 24th, 2014 | J | 11,368 notes
what do you think dean would do if he actually saw a halo above castiel's head?

Anonymous

castihalo:

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"I believe the wise woman’s name was Be Once."

"Beyonce, Cas. Beyonce."

1 month ago on June 24th, 2014 | J | 7,126 notes

crowley-for-king:

Cutest BFFs ever…

1 month ago on June 24th, 2014 | J | 22,364 notes
mr-egbutt:

WAKE UP POTTER
WE’RE GOING TO THE ZOO

mr-egbutt:

WAKE UP POTTER

WE’RE GOING TO THE ZOO

1 month ago on June 24th, 2014 | J | 568,262 notes

kitoky:

#people who don’t like Nine don’t deserve him anyway

1 month ago on June 24th, 2014 | J | 83,710 notes
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